CONCUSSIONS


Concussions have become a major talking point in recent years, not just among the medical community, but as a part of the mainstream news, within the sports industry, and with parents.  An estimated 1.6-3.8 million sports/recreation-related concussions occur in the United States each year.  Reportedly, 23% of the adults and 20% of the teens in the United States said that they have had a concussion, and about 75% of adults and teens have sought medical attention.  These are staggering statistics!

Physio PS can drastically alter the outcomes of a person’s head injury.  The Physio PS monitor can detect the slightest concussion, enabling the diagnosis without the presents of the telltale symptoms.  This ensures that the proper treatment and precautions can be implemented.  Making sure that the likelihood of long-term health concerns, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease, can be prevented.

Diagnosing a concussion is not as clear cut as one may imagine.  “We still don’t have a gold standard definition [for concussions]. Many of the symptoms of concussion, out of the context of being hit in the head, are quite common.”, according to Dr. Christopher Giza, director of the UCLA Steve Tisch BrainSPORT program. 

Concussions are brain injuries caused by a blow to the head or a force that causes the brain to move quickly within the skull. The symptoms can include a loss of consciousness, headache, nausea and vomiting, sensitivity to light or sound, irritability, muddled thinking and memory problems.  “Many of the symptoms associated with concussions are subjective,” says Giza, who also co-authored the American Academy of Neurology’s guideline on sports and concussions.  Additionally, based on CDC reports, only between 4 percent and 5 percent of go to the emergency room for head injuries, meaning most people take the “walk it off” or “tough it out” approach to their head injuries.  While most people do not suffer from long-term impacts from a concussion, between 10% and 20% may experience symptoms like depression, headaches or difficulty concentrating, and sleep problems for an extended period of time.



‘RFa’ is known to be a measure of Parasympathetic activity and ‘LFa’ is known to be a measure of Sympathetic activity, based on reference: Colombo J, Arora RR, DePace NL, Vinik AI, Clinical Autonomic Dysfunction: Measurement, Indications, Therapies, and Outcomes. Springer Science + Business Media, New York, NY; 2014.